10 Struggles Depressed People Avoid Talking About

Thought Catalog

Shutterstock / Adam GregorShutterstock / Adam Gregor

When I was 16, I was diagnosed with clinical depression. After the diagnosis, my uncle slapped me on the back and said, “Welcome to the family kid,” while my family all compared drugs around the kitchen table. I’m extremely lucky that my family not only accepted that depression is a real, serious issue, but they understood it. (I come from a long line of clinically depressed people.) They were mindful to make sure that my depression wasn’t used as a crutch or an excuse, but thankfully, I never once heard the unhelpful “Just suck it up and deal with it,” and for that, I will be eternally grateful. (I also wrote about 10 brutal truths single people never talk about.)

Depression is different for everyone, but over the years I’ve noticed a few things that don’t seem to waver. They hold fast in their level…

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We have internal guidance. Learn to listen.

Everything Matters: Beyond Meds

ying yangInternal guidance

We would be much better served if we were told by mental health professionals from the very beginning to trust ourselves. Instead, the entire system is fraught with the infantilization of the client…this is (in general) true of both psychology and psychiatry as currently practiced.

We absolutely need others, we are ultimately interdependent and all connected. Everything matters…but the wrong other is often far worse than no one at all when we are hurting or in need…re-traumatization often being the rule rather than the exception when one enters the mental health system.

When we learn to trust ourselves then we know when and if we should proceed with a helping relationship. This is what needs to be taught as soon as someone begins to seek help. Really it should be taught from the minute we’re born, but instead we generally are taught to stop listening to ourselves…

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Somatic Wisdom Technique Part 1

Everything Matters: Beyond Meds

By Jon Keyes

I believe that the human body is not only a physical entity but also carries emotional and spiritual energy as well.  Our joys, fears, sadness, humor and love are not just intellectual concepts or part of a chemical soup located in the brain.   They are indeed matrices of energy that can be found in different parts of the body.  When we feel tension in our neck, we may be literally carrying the fears and frustrations of our job in that area.  When we feel depleted and hollow in our chest area, we may be carrying the sadness about the end of an intimate relationship in that area.

Throughout time, traditional societies have often talked about emotional states as related to parts of the body.  In India, emotions are often related to chakras, or energetic vortices located in 7 areas from the head down to the perineum.  In…

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Voting for Murphy

Hopeworks Community

The response of his colleagues to the Murphy Bill in the Cromnibus Bill was to put it charitably less than overwhelming. The media, which has seemingly had Rep. Murphy on speed dial, seemed to think Senator Warren was the news. Not only was Rep Murphy not newsworthy, he was not even noteworthy. And all of this the day before the Newtown anniversary.

And it makes me think. Perhaps Murphy is not quite yet ready for coronation as savior of all things mental health.

Let me use Tennessee as an example to make a point.

The mental health budget in Tennessee could possibly be cut as much as 7%. That cut will affect the welfare of thousands and thousands of people. In addition, Tenn Care (Tennessee medicaid) is cutting reimbursement rates to providers by 4% and on top of that is recommending an additional $18000000 in cuts for mental health services…

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Getting healthy

Everything Matters: Beyond Meds

Click to see enlarged view Click to see enlarged view

I find it ironic that practicing simple healthy habits is called “alternative” health and/or medicine.

I’m not using “alternative” health modalities. I’m getting healthy without medication after conventional medical treatment with drugs profoundly wrecked my wellbeing. Our language obfuscates. It’s quite Orwellian, in fact.

Getting healthy in my mind means returning to or rediscovering what being in tune with our body/mind and spirit entails.  Nothing alternative about that. It’s about returning to our animal inheritance. It’s foundational to simply being human.

Conventional medicine, in general,  as practiced, is what should be called alternative. I’m not talking about catastrophic care. That is when our medicine can truly work miracles. No, I’m talking about all the chronic conditions that are caused by the harm we’ve incurred to the atmosphere, the planet and our bodies. We dump toxins into the environment and eat polluted and processed foods that don’t…

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Learn to come back, to return to being present over and over again

Everything Matters: Beyond Meds

leapThe primary focus of this path of choosing wisely, of this training to de-escalate aggression, is learning to stay present. Pausing very briefly, frequently throughout the day, is an almost effortless way to do this. For just a few seconds we can be right here. Meditation is another way to train in learning to stay, or, as one student put it more accurately, learning to come back, to return to being present over and over again. The truth is, anyone who’s ever tried meditation learns really quickly that we are almost never fully present. I remember when I was first given meditation instruction. It sounds so simple: Just sit down, get comfortable, and bring light awareness to your breath. When your mind wanders, gently come back and stay present with your breath. I thought, “This will be easy.” Then someone hit a gong to begin and I tried it. What…

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Healing through the dark emotions

Everything Matters: Beyond Meds

Below are some excerpts from a Sun Magazine from a few years ago. The article is about Miriam Greenspan’s work about healing through grief. This book was helpful when my brother died, several years ago now. I posted these excerpts with different commentary first in 2007. I’ve made some edits to the commentary.

Grief has a tremendous power. When we submerge it in avoidance, we can’t use it for spiritual growth. Allow grief’s power to propel you.

The book is about embracing what is so that one can heal and transform through what becomes a process of acceptance. This has worked for me with not just more commonly understood grief issues but trauma in general too.

Miriam Greenspan, from Healing Through the Dark Emotions: The Wisdom of Grief, Fear, and Despair

Here is an excerpt from the introduction to the interview:

A psychotherapist for more than 33 years, Greenspan…

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